Taking Seroquel: Expect This

You are going to sleep a lot!

If you are planning to take Seroquel, expect that you are going to sleep an awful lot. So much so, that you should assume that you won’t be able to do anything for 5-7 days after you start taking it. No office work, no social activities, no house work. Not even little everyday tasks.

The only thing I did in the first five days is sleep, stagger groggily around the house, sleep more, feed the dogs, eat, and then take meds and go back to sleep. Really. For five days. 

It started improving somewhat after the 5th day, but slowly. If you decide to take Seroquel, I recommend that you…

  1. Take vacation for at least 2 weeks,
  2. Tell people that you will not be able to attend any social activities for two weeks,
  3. Hand over all the tasks that you do at home to someone else. This includes tasks like taking out the garbage or doing dishes or cooking.
  4. Don’t expect to be able to drive.
  5. If you have responsibilities elsewhere, hand them over temporarily to someone else for 2-3 weeks.

You will not be able to supervise or take care of children or pets for at least a week, so make sure someone else is able to do so. I am not kidding. You’ll be that groggy.

Start with a low first dose and increase it slowly

I’d suggest that you discuss with your psychiatrist about starting with 100 mg Seroquel per day and slowly increasing in 50 mg steps every 2 days until you reach the desired dose. That way you have some time to get used to the Seroquel.

If you start off by taking a dose of 200 mg or more, there’s a good chance you’ll sleep for upwards of 20 hours the first night (I slept for 32 hours). Sleeping for so long is kinda scary and kinda traumatic and might cause you to stop taking the Seroquel.

If your desired dose is higher than 300 mg, slowly increasing your dose in steps extends the amount of time you’ll be out of commission for. Assume that for each additional 50 mg step past 300 mg, you’ll need 1-2 days extra vacation.


Seroquel increases my productivity

When I take Seroquel, it allows me to make decisions and make things happen. Seroquel doesn’t feel like an antidepressant, it feels more like something that helps increase my productivity, a focusing and doing aide, if you will.

Seroquel also noticeably makes me less fearful of people – so I’m more likely to call someone, answer my phone, send or reply to an e-mail, write a business letter, call a friend, or feel comfortable talking to people generally.

For me, Seroquel acts a lot like a more powerful version of Tegretol.

…but still makes me groggy

So, if I can communicate with people more and get more done, then this is great, right? Well, it’s not quite a free ride. Even after becoming accustomed to the Seroquel, I still felt groggy during the day. In fact I felt like falling asleep every time I sat down, though it didn’t interfere with the stuff I wanted to get done.

I have found that getting out of chairs can be an effort- it requires me to have two hands on the arm rests and to make a deliberate effort to stand up. I also tend to lean against things rather than just stand up.

and causes sugar cravings

One of the odd side effects of Seroquel is that I have to have sugar every one and a half to two hours – if I don’t get the sugar, I get wan, light headed, and groggyenough to pass out.

This means that when I wake up, I have a cup of sweet hot chocolate (2 heaping teaspoons of sugar), and then throughout the day I drink hot chocolate every two hours or so. Or have biscuits (Pepperidge Farm Brussels cookies, yum!). Or Coke. It’s a pretty high sugar intake daily and it seems to be necessary.

Oddly enough, coffee doesn’t seem to have a noticeable effect in stopping the grogginess. Nor does a regular meal like lunch, unless I have a Coke or juice with it.

and chapped lips

The other noticeable side effect has been if I don’t drink enough fluids, I get chapped lips and dry hands. Given that I drink so much hot chocolate, this hasn’t been a big deal, but I’d still recommend that you keep moisturising cream and a tube of lip balm close by because the chapped lips can be painful.


A dose of Seroquel makes me very sleepy

I take my dose of Seroquel XR (200 mg) on evenings around 6:00 – 6:30 pm. Once I  take it, the Seroquel causes me to fall asleep within 2-3 hours, so that I am usually in bed between 8:00 pm and 9:30 pm.

The time before I fall asleep is fairly variable and the effect has occurred within as little as 1 hour or extended as long as 4 1/2 hours.

Crucially, there is very little time between when I realise the Seroquel is going to knock me out and when it actually does - there’s about 15 minutes between when I start feeling groggy and when I fall asleep. The sleepiness is intense and it is extremely difficult to fight to stay awake.

and messes with my social life

What this means is that after I take Seroquel I can’t drive at all – I may fall asleep at the wheel. It also means that if I want to do any social activities after 6:00 pm, someone has to provide transport and I may very well fall asleep at a restaurant or in the cinema or at a cocktail party. Or I may stagger around groggily, looking very much as if I am drunk.

Since the time between when I take the Seroquel and when I fall asleep is so variable, I can’t accurately predict if I will be okay if I go out. After a few attempts at doing this, I found it easier to simply stay at home after taking the dose of Seroquel.

Yes, I could take the medications later than 6:00 pm. But how late? Suppose we say about 10:30 pm, so I can go out with friends for dinner.

…and screws up the next day if I take a late dose

With the Seroquel, I consistently sleep for about 9-10 hours every night. If I take the dose at 6:00 pm as I do now, and fall asleep at around 8:30 pm, then I will get up at about 5:30 – 6:00 am. After coping with the groggy morning, I am able to start the day about 8:00 am. Not too bad.

If I take the Seroquel dose at 10:30 pm and fall asleep immediately, I’ll wake up 7:30 – 8:00 am. Add in two hours of being somewhat groggy on awakening and I’m not ready to face the morning until about 9:30 – 10:00 am. That’s a little late to get the day started, and leaves me out of sorts and fairly unproductive for the rest of the day.

…really messes with my social life

Bottom line – If I go socialising with friends to even a moderate hour on evenings and take the Seroquel dose on returning home, I lose the following day. If I take the dose before going out with friends or while out with them, I may fall asleep while socialising.

After a while, I started suggesting to people that we meet for breakfast, or lunch, or a coffee at 4:00 pm.


I can’t exercise on mornings

It turns out that I also can’t exercise on mornings. The grogginess that bothers me on mornings affects my coordination and can leave me staggering about like a drunken man. It’s not a state conducive to exercise. The grogginess effect wears off during the day, so the best time to exercise is the 3-4 hours before I take my medications.

and travel requires careful planning

If you plan to travel, the grogginess and tendency to fall asleep matters. I had to travel and I had visions of falling asleep in the airport and missing my flight. Or having flight attendants being unable to wake me at the end of the flight. Or staggering up to an Immigration official as if I was drunk or drugged. The concern was sufficient that I stopped the Seroquel before starting to travel.

More prosaically, I wonder if people taking Seroquel who have subway or train or bus rides fall asleep and regularly miss their stops.


I suppose I could adjust the organisation of my day so that I can use my evenings more, but I am not sure how. With Seroquel, there seems to be a fixed amount of time that you spend asleep or groggy. For me that’s about 10-12 hours a day and that amount doesn’t seem to decrease with ongoing Seroquel use.  The only trade off seems to be between having more awake time on an evening vs. on a morning. Here’s my daily schedule

  • 6:00 am: Wake up.
  • 6:00 am – 8:00 am: Wander around the house groggily and out of focus.
  • 8:00 am – 6:00 pm: Do regular activities during the day
  • 6:00 pm – 6:30 pm: Take medication - Seroquel XR (200 mg).
  • 6.30 pm – 9:30 pm: Stay home and do stuff /  relax until I fall asleep.
  • 8:00 pm – 9:30 pm: Go to bed

Any time I go to sleep later, I get up later, and the regular activities of the day start later. It’s more like I am rotating the entire schedule rather than adjusting or fine tuning it. That rotation may work better for some of you, but I like the relatively early start of the day.


In Summary

Once, I get past the initial sleepiness, Seroquel does work as a mood stabiliser – it makes me more able to focus, and more able to get things done, and it allows me to interact with people more easily.  I get more done and I keep in contact with the people I need to.

However, balanced against the productivity is the sleepiness / grogginess that never went away and which remains an intrusive element in my life. I gain productivity, but I also lose half the day to sleep. If I am currently unproductive, that’s not a bad trade off, but in the long run, the sleepiness / grogginess seems to intrude too much into my life.

If you want additional information on Seroquel, check out the Crazy Meds website.

Note: I have found that if I take any medication on an ongoing basis, I develop a resistance to it, and it stops working. It was for this reason that I stopped taking Seroquel.


You might feel cold when coming off Seroquel

For about six days after I stopped taking Seroquel, I complained a lot about feeling cold. A lot. Didn’t matter where I was.

It’s hard to tell what causes each symptom you notice, and after coming off the Seroquel, I’d been getting very little sleep. But the complaints of being cold…

  1. Only started after I came of the Seroquel, and
  2. I’ve handled sleepless nights before with fairly mild aftereffects, and
  3. The temperature here had been 24-30 degrees Celsius (75-85 F).

I’ve put feeling cold as a possible side effect of coming off Seroquel. Any feedback in the comments would be appreciated.

45 thoughts on “Taking Seroquel: Expect This

  1. It’s interesting you mention the sugar intake – my boyfriend is taking Seroquel, and I’ve noticed that he’ll pass on healthy food in favor of sugary stuff. I wonder if it’s because the sugar reactivates the melatonin levels in your brain – giving you a sugar “high” ?

    I kind of wish it weren’t that way – the meds are doing enough damage to his body and I’m concerned about his insulin levels now.

    It’s a dual-edged sword.

    • It feels more like going from nearly catatonic to being able to stay awake – there is no sugar high effet. I’ve no idea what the underlying biological chemistry is – I’m just reporting what I feel.

      Seroquel is implicated in causing Type II Diabetes. I’d suggest that your boyfriend consider regular (monthly or bimonthly) fasting glucose blood tests for a while to track any possible variations.

    • When I hear of anyone on the drug Seroquel I panic.This is poison. It killed my adopted son who had was born with fetal alcohol syndrome. He was bi polar and had many issues..The last drug given to him was Seroquel. First came weight gain (100 lbs) over the 5 years he was on it. Within 6 months of taking it he would have spikes in blood sugar levels as high as 800. He developed pancreatitis. He went on insulin to control it. At the time we did not relate this issues to the drug. He said it made him feel better and he couldn’t sleep without it. Then several diabetic comas and bouts of pancreatitis excessive sleeping developed sleep apnea and had to have a cpap mask. He loved the drug.and there must be some feel good stuff in there. Basically it killed his pancreas and him. Please be aware of this if you are on this medication.. The makers of the drug Astra Zeneca know this. They paid us 87 thousand dollars. They make billions off this drug. I would bet my life that nobody that is associated with the manufacturing or research or corporate executives or any of their family members take this drug..

    • Nice try. However, the term “recluse” and the term “crazy” often go together for a reason – as we shy away from society, our behaviour starts to deviate from the social norms. It’s not clear to me that we can fit the social norms exactly, but we are better off trying to fit in, and if we do, chances are we’ll have richer lives.

      • @c: In a completely non-ironic (and non-troll) way, could I ask if this works in providing an acceptable lifestyle? ‘Cause if it does, could you give me some pointers – I do advocate fitting in, but it IS tiring.

  2. One thing to note: the road to being yourself doesnt means it is debris-free. It is, if not, harder than trying to fit in. So why try at all? Why bother all this uphill nonsense of it all? Because at the end of the day, it gives us a reason to live.

    • @c: You are right about the reason to live part, though I describe it slightly differently. Every year I crash and burn about three or four times. So three or four times every year I have try to rebuild my exercise program, catch up on work, apologise to friends and family I’ve ignored, see if I can salvage the projects I’ve been working on, and lose 15-20 pounds. And I don’t always succeed – there are things that drop out of my life or are put on hold indefinitely.

      Yeah – it is extremely exhausting and heart breakingly frustrating to know that I am expending all this energy just to stay in one place – it’s like a Red Queen situation. There are days when the self pity crashes in and I really really don’t want to get up and rebuild my life again KNOWING that in a month or two I’ll have to do it all over again. Again.

      The only thing that keeps me getting up each time is the knowledge that this isn’t a game or a class or a race or a job. It’s my life. To me, giving up trying means…what exactly? Giving up living? Honestly, that idea terrifies me. If the desire for a rich fulfilling life is the carrot I dangle in front of myself, the terror is the big stick just behind me as well.

      With regards to being yourself / fitting in, I’m wondering if we are talking somewhat at cross purposes. I didn’t intend fitting in to mean “be like other people / conform”. I intended it at a slightly more building block or root level – more along the lines of “make sure you can have a conversation without sounding wacko” or “be able to understand why people are showing the emotion they are”. And I mention these because I don’t always get it right. Fitting in for me means getting the social glue right, so we can then explain ourselves as endearingly eccentric or consciously individualistic rather than just being seen as weird. My apology for not stating it right the first time (and for being unable to just stop writing).

      Thanks for writing to me. Much appreciated.

      • Basically it is all about perspective. One could do the same thing but have a different approach and mentality. I can either think of it as a big reset button or a time for me to transform and evolve. For us, the only difference from the rest is just that we goes through the pupa stage of a butterfly life significantly more times. When you stop clinging to the idea of normalcy (what is normalcy anyways?), of trying to control a whirlwind, it is then you realise, nothing is constant and permanent, and you relax and actually enjoy “life”, look at things with a step back and whatever comes your way, simply comes your way.

      • I’ve found a good way to prevent the Red Queen syndrome you describe and keep on top of things through the crests and troughs, as it were.

        There’s a book called “Getting Things Done” by David Allen, which is designed for executives, but I’ve found that his method — which is surprisingly simple and intuitive — also works for the problems that accrue in an ADD/Bipolar life.

        The GTD method, combined with Omni-Focus software, allows me to fully externalize everything I have to do, so that it’s off my mind but it still gets done!

        You will not be able to implement GTD during a trough, and attempting it at the top of a crest will be difficult b/c you’ll find yourself going down rabbit holes, but if you tackle it on the upswing, you can get it in place.

        I’d recommend looking into it.

  3. thank you for your articles, they are so helpful! I have been diagnosed with bipolar disorder 6 months ago and have been given Seroquel straight away. I have stopped taking my medication last month as it was becoming way too difficult to manage my life on medication.
    Seroquel left me tired and lifeless the first month and it did not get much better after 4 months of treatment. I was given 25g to start with (without any indication on how it would affect me! you can imagine my surprise when I woke up after 15h of sleep, coming off an hypomanic phase when I was sleeping 5h a night!) and slowly built up to 150mg. Even on such a small dose, I felt gloomy all the time and really scared of people and of going out in busy places particularly. I couldn t cope with the pace of my job (I am a teacher and at times, it can be a pretty demanding job) and was tired of pretending to smile and to monitor my moods just to appear normal.
    It was a real shock to my system even if it helped me to rebuild my life and take control of my finances.
    I am trying to control my moods and to give myself a bit of space when I am unwell and your blog and website helped me a lot to feel less guilty about not always be able to cope. Thanks again!

    • I was diagnosed with bipolar aswell june 3 2009. i was put on olanzapine on a high dosage. i ran out 2 month ago and had no dr nothing, the hospitals wouldnt even give me refills …i went 1 month without. the first week i was fine but the next 2 and a half weeks, i went through extreme withdrawls. i HIGHLY recommend to not go ont it. olanzapine also has alot of side effects…id rather be sleeping for 14 hrs then feeling the way i did again…good luck with this…also do not go lithium, im on it and at a high dosage and my liver is starting to fail, also high side effects

  4. Seroquel makes me so tired it is nearly impossible to function. I take 150 mg. and end up sleeping for 12 hours and am groggy all day even with Starbucks. I think about using it for only those times the depression gets bad, but am afraid to be without it.

    • I’ve found I can’t operate on even 50mg/day. Not with my job.

      I now use 25mg, and most nights I split that in half!

      It doesn’t stop the roller-coaster, but it flattens it out enough that I can live my life.

      Yes, I still have times when I want to check out of this life, yes I still have times when I’m bouncing all over, but I can now get 6 hrs of good sleep w/ a half dose (which is more refreshing than 8 hours of sleep w/out it b/c my sleep-wake barrier was so thin) and with a full dose on weekends I can get 8+ hrs sleep.

      I hate the lows, but I know how to survive them, and with the highs controlled somewhat I can take advantage of the creativity they offer.

      Still stressful, but better. And in my opinion, also better than the zombie-life I get from high doses.

  5. I really laughed at the staggering around the house in the morning, I do that too. Been on seroquel for almost a year & my Dr. just upped my dosage to 300 mg & ever since I still stagger in the morning but then I start feeling a bit manic which is scary. I also totally relate to the sugar thing! I mean, it’s just insanity!!

  6. Hi. I have recently been put on this for about a month now. im still extremely tired all the time but i think thats because of the time i take my meds. i have a 3 year old daughter . and i dont take my meds till i know shes asleep, wich latly isnt till 11 pm for some reason. It will knock me out within a half hour and im only at 50mg one tablet right now. ive tried coffee all through out the day to wake me up and it usually takes about 6 large black cups to do it and then also ive been having sugary items or drinks every hour or 2. i cant seem to hang of it. the only side effect besides the sleeping that i have been having is the head aches once in awhile. its hard to socialize when you have the disorder i have and being on these meds.does anyone have any advice??

  7. I’ve been taking a low dose of Seroquel for a couple of months. Took some time to adjust the dosage so that I can sleep but I’m not a zombie the next day (my job requires that my mind be active and creative almost as soon as I wake up).

    But here’s an odd thing that’s popped up which might be a side-effect: I can no longer keep track of days of the week in my head. I have to look at my watch or computer or ask someone.

    Anyone else had anything like that happen?

  8. I have just discovered this blog and it makes happy. Where i live there is such a stigma to bipolar it is shocking. I am in and out of hospital quite frequently because my case is rather severe, and I was asked by my boss before my last admittence (i was discharged on Friday last) if i was discharged’dischargeddepressed again’!

    I envy you guys for being able to almost function on only one kind of mess a day. Seroquel is the latest addition to my proud collection of meds. I started off on only 300mg of epilim a day, but soon my dose had to be upped and it went on and on from there. I haven’t had any serious side effects, but i do sleep very well on seroquel (meaning a good 7 hours).I am now taking an astounding 7 tablets a day to simply stay semi-sane.

    Thank you for sharing your stories.

  9. Seroquel should only be taken if the benefits outway the risks for you. In my case I have had to try many different medicine combinations and it always seems to come back that I need Seroquel along with Cymbalta. I take 400mg Seroquel XR daily. My doctor told me it must be taken 1 hour before eating or 2 hours after eating because your stomach needs to be empty. If you don’t follow the time constraints, you will mess yourself up! The medicine is extended release, but if there is food in the stomach, it starts releasing at a much faster rate. Therefore, not only will you get sleepier sooner, but the medicine may not stay at high enough levels in your system to get you through until the next dose. My routine has to be almost set in stone in order for me to get the required amount of sleep, because yes, this medication will make you sleep hard for 8-12 hours depending on your body. I don’t eat anything after 2:30pm, so I can take my Seroquel at 4:30pm. I eat dinner between 5:30pm and 6:30pm. I’m falling asleep anywhere between 8pm and 9pm. I get up at 6am and yes I’m groggy for about 30 minutes, but then I start getting awake and I feel like I had good sleep, vs bad sleep where you toss all night and don’t really get rest. If I take my meds any later, I am so screwed up the next day. I don’t get to sleep early enough, and then I can barely get out of bed at 6am. I have learned that I need this medicine, so I have to just adapt to the time constraints and live with it. I have gained weight on Seroquel, and I do seem to crave sweets and carbs. The only other problem I’ve had is that I developed an ulcer from the Seroquel and I had to go on medicine for that.

  10. Hi I have been taking 5omg of it as well as my normal anxiety med during morning. First 3 days I felt amazing confident. Friendly and less aggressive. . Now the fourth day im cranky as and fell asleep driving in the morning and same in afternoon. . I take it at 10 b4 bed and now am fearful to drive in case I fall asleep… help please also sugar cravings r like crazy… does this stop

  11. I’ve been taking prozac 20mg with 10mg Adderall XR x2 a day and have felt pretty good. Mood is good, confident, energized, no negative thoughts. But I had to take prozac because I couldn’t fill my original prescription of Seroquel 300mg after my hospital stay and I was on it for about 3 weeks then switch to prozac. Went back to Doc and she thinks the prozac is causing mania stage and that is why I feel so elevated. Confused, I figured I’ll keep rolling with the current prozac/adderall because I feel great and if the mania crashes into a valley then I’ll start taking the seroquel, seems like that’s the best way to fully determine whether I am bipolar or just have major depression. Anybody have any thoughts, would appreciate any feedback.

  12. Hello,

    My boyfriend has just been prescribed Seroquel @400/day. He’s to take one in the morning, one in the afternoon, and two before bed. He was in the midst of a very manic episode. He was diagnosed with ADHD as a child, took Ritalin, and hated it. His doctor is not sure if he has BP/PTSD/ADHD or some combination, but the mania was getting so bad he hadn’t slept in days and could not shut his racing brain down.
    So my problem is, here is a man who has never really been medicated, and if it weren’t for his suffering of late, would not accept the medication as a possible option. I suffer from MDD, so I know that it is a long, winding road to find out what meds work for you and what “cocktail” will help, and I am afraid that all this sleepiness (it’s only been a couple of days) will scare him off the Seroquel and then we’d be right back where we started. He is adamant he does not want to be a zombie.
    I am wondering if his dr. will dial back the dosage if he feels better when he goes back next month? He is a vibrant, clever, funny man when he is doing well, and he hasn’t had a manic episode in over 4 years. I just don’t want to see him in a chemical straitjacket.

  13. I have just started taking Seroquel for severe anxiety or rather i felt like i was having a breakdown. It doesn’t make me that groggy or tired as i expected. I found the Avanza (antidepressant) was worse especially for the first hr after a dose and also the food craving where much worse, could have eaten a cardboard box. Still feeling symptoms does anyone know how long it takes before seroquel has reached it’s maximum affect i have heard it can take months.

  14. It’s so interesting, at how you pretty much say it knocks you out for long periods of time first night I took Seroquel (200mg) I only slept a few hours which wasn’t enough. I am not taking 1,000mg at night or 1,200mg if manic (at some points it wasn’t enough and also took 100mg Trazadone) and during the day I take 200mg my Dr said its A neurological thing that I obviously needed this much Seroquel. Guess I should be thankful I don’t sleep that much!

  15. This is a fantastic article and one of the first I have read that puts Seroquel in a good light! I am 20 years old and have been on Seroquel for nearly two yrs for paranoid schizophrenia, anxiety and deppression and i can honestly say it has changed my life. At first it was difficult to deal with the constant grogginess however it does get easier. unfortunatly you will always find it hard to get up in the morning and it takes about 2 hours to fully wake up. however if you are on XR (slow release) you may get the feeling of being constantly tired. Another thing to be aware of is that you may get mild hallucinations when you first start taking Seroquel however these pass in the first 2 weeks.

  16. What a thorough presentation of Seroguel. Thank you for sharing your experiences. I just started the med a week ago to supplement a major depressive episode and am struggling with the grogginess as well. Your information, and your schedule in particular, gives me a really good tool to start to figure out what will work for me. My challenge is having 4 kids to get to bed and also get up early for school. This is generally only a 7-8 hour window. At least now I have more information and a a place to start. Thanks again.

  17. I really appreciate this blog to. I am 28 with two children and have recently been put on seroquel for mild bipolar (type 2) I started on 25mg and that knocked me out, it was great I slept well and felt great through the day, almost a bit manic though and was a bit forgetful, I would start something then see something else that needed doing and just wonder off to do that instead, lol. I’m now up to 100mg and I don’t like it as much, it makes me really groggy when I get up in the morning and quite cranky with the kids. I’m off to see the doc in the morn, I’m going to ask if I can go back down. He said initially that 100mg is the lowest dose to help bipolar so I hope he does not take me off altogether. The other thing I really luv about it is I don’t crave other substances ie. alcohol or spice/pot. I have had substance abuse issues since I was 12 and this is the first time in my life that I honestly don’t want any substances, it is GREAT, I feel so “normal” and in control. I just don’t like the grogginess and crankiness of 100mg. Thanks, I just felt like sharing.

    • i had strange twitches in my jaw (i bit my tongue a few times lol) and strange sudden movements in my hands and fingers when i first started taking seroquel lol, it stopped after a while though…thankfully! :P

  18. Here’s the deal folks, medication is going to be unique to everyone’s brain chemistry. These affects from this article are not the case for me. If you take more medication your will feel “medicated”. I am not a doctor however anyone who is sleeping 32 hours probably should adjust according (just saying) Your situation is unique. Dealing a with a chemical imbalance myself, I utilize a “lifestyle” treatment, relying on medication last. Since taking a very small amount of Seroquel, I have found that I am alert, sharp, and focused being more able to organize my thinking. I was hesitant at first because of the drug classification but it works. As well I should considering the price of this designer drug.

  19. My GP added 25mg Seroquel IR to my 100mg of Pristiq 3 weeks ago, and I’ve had a lot of difficulty with this drug. Obviously, the groginess is a problem. I’m a university student and it’s the business end of semester and I’m struggling to focus during the day. I can hardly study and when I go to the gym, I’m so exhausted when I return home that I can’t even think straight.

    I’m going to ask my doctor to take me off the seroquel because though it’s been fantastic for my insomnia and anxiety, I can’t cope with not being able to be productive.

    • I think that will fade over time. Your system has to get used to it so don’t quit it immediately…unless you have waited a while.

  20. On day 3 of seroquel. Sure wish I was warned about how it affects me..included with all you talk about, I have lucid dreams and feel Im on another level of consciousness 24/7. Started on 50mg. up to 75mg. instead of 100mg. Supposed to be on 200mg. in 2 days??? please email me if you had this happen!!

  21. It gets way better after a year or so of taking it. The groggy have to go to sleep immediately wares off within that time, probably shorter. I can even stay up pretty late into the morning so :) . I don’t feel knocked out anymore but I did when i very first started taking it and the first few months it would put me straight to sleep.

  22. ive been taking 150mg of seroquel for bipolar 2 maintenance for 4 yrs now. I absolutely LOVE this medication! its the first time in 20 years that ive have felt ‘normal’ and stress free. I have no anxiety or paranoid phobias, all of which disappeared within a couple of week of starting. It hasnt cured my mood swings, but i havent had any drastic episodes of either depression or hypers. I tend to ‘bounce around’ sometimes between low mood and slightly elevated at times. i guess this is the drug controlling the level of mood and stopping it developing into a major episode either way??
    I sleep like a baby although i sometimes have lucid nightmares, but they are a lot less frequent than before. The drowsiness wears off (or you get used to it lol) and provided I have had enough sleep, i feel great throughout the day.
    Negatives….3 stone weight gain :( sugar and carb craves, particularly when im in a low mood. i did experience sugar lows (sweating, palpitations, rapid heartbeat etc) earlier on in the medication, but i dont seem to experience this so much anymore.
    I also feel after 4 yrs that it is maybe not working as well as it did :( i have been in a swinging low mood/normal mood every few days for a couple of months now….maybe i need my dose increasing…..
    All in all, this medication changed my life ;)

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